Whales learn songs like humans, verse by verse

Humpback whales learn songs in segments – like the verses of a human song – and can remix them, a new study involving University of Queensland research has found. The study featured data from Associate Professor Michael Noad of the

Read More

Dragonfly brains predict the path of their prey

New research has shown how the brain of a dragonfly anticipates the movement of its prey, enabling it to hunt successfully. This knowledge could lead to innovations in fields such as robot vision. Researchers at the University of Adelaide and

Read More

Healthy sharks sustain healthy oceans

A team from UWA has completed a four month research expedition looking for signs of healthy coral reefs in the remote Kimberley. They observed an unexpectedly high number of sharks in the region, suggesting sharks play a key role in regulating

Read More

Coral reef diversity a game of rock-paper-scissors

For a long time, scientists have wondered how a large number of coral reef species can live together while competing for a single, limiting resource. Why doesn’t a single species that is better at competing for the resource crowd out

Read More

Tasmania’s fisheries cooked by record-breaking heatwave

Climate change was almost certainly responsible for a marine heatwave off Tasmania’s east coast in 2015/16 that lasted 251 days and at its greatest extent had an area of impact seven times the size of Tasmania. The marine heat wave

Read More

Alien ice on Earth: forms in billionths of a second

Stanford researchers have for the first time captured the freezing of water, molecule-by-molecule, into a strange, dense form called ice VII (“ice seven”), found naturally in otherworldly environments, such as when icy planetary bodies collide. In addition to helping scientists

Read More

Ants build constantly moving Eiffel Towers

If you want to see the Eiffel Tower, you don’t have to go to Paris. Just look down at your feet –but watch out for ants. Fire ants use their bodies to construct Eiffel Tower-looking structures when they run into

Read More

The maths behind how fish form a shoal

It’s a mesmerising sight – a flock of birds or school of fish swirling and banking in fluid motion. But just how do individual birds, fish and some herding mammals move in unison? And where does mathematics come in to

Read More

Weeds head for the hills as climate warms

As temperatures rise, plants head up mountainsides, with weeds spreading to higher altitudes twice as fast as native plants, according to an international team of researchers. While it was known that this occurred in native plants, this is the first

Read More

Sea spiders move oxygen by pumping guts (not hearts)

To keep blood and oxygen flowing throughout their bodies, most animals depend on a beating heart, but not sea spiders. Researchers have discovered that sea spiders use a strange alternative: they move blood and oxygen throughout most of their bodies

Read More